Yule (Ærre-Giuli, Hrutmanudhr , Jól, Jul, Yuletide, December) 27th
Eighth night of Yule, Sacred to Skathi and Ullr

“Hunter’s Goddess, Snowshoe Goddess, Goddess of Cold Counsel Goddess of Revenge, Loki’s Agony, Scathing Goddess Wise god-bride, Ski Goddess, dweller of the rocks, You who have helped us provide for our families in this coldest of times We honor you during this darkest and holiest time of the year, ski-god, bow-god, hunting-god and shield-god. God of Oaths, Listener at the Flames, Dweller of Yalir. You who have helped us provide for our families in this coldest of times We honor you during this darkest and holiest time of the year! Hail Skathi! Hail Ullr! Hail the Gods!”- Dave and Sandi Carron with Ravencast – The Asatru Podcast

Keep in mind the importance of the hunters in our lives. On this day many try to remember Skathi and Ullr as gods of the hunt. Our ancestors still hunted this time of year to keep meats and nourishment on the table even though hunting in the north this time of year was difficult and dangerous. Raise a horn to those that provided the meat on the table as we feast and share.

On this day some Asatru remind themselves of the virtue of Truth. Truth is the virtue that most led our kindred to embrace this statement of values as our own. Early in our discussions, we decided that no matter what values we chose to hold up as our own, truth must be among them. It is a word that holds so much in its definition, and includes such a wide variety of moral and philosophical beliefs that we were all drawn to it as a simple statement of what we stood for.

Today some will keep in mind the month of Harvest (August) and Freyfaxi (Loaf Fest). Freyfaxi marked the beginning of the harvest in Iceland. Dedicated to the God of the harvest, it was a time for celebration with horse races, martial sports, and of course a Blot to Freyr and a feast. Thor, as hallower and defender of the fields, is also honored as is his fair wife Sif whose golden hair reminds us of the corn. Traditionally, three stalks of the first grain are bound together into a sheaf and kept as an amulet of fortune. Oftentimes, this sheaf, bound by a wise woman, was left in the field as magical protection for the crop. The penultimate sheaf is kept for the Yule feast. The last sheaf is left on the field for Odin’s horse Sleipnir.

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